Diesel Fuel Filtration 101

Posted by Jim Harlan on Wed, Apr. 02, 2014

Diesel engines are widely used today. You can find them inside buses and tractor trailers traveling our roads, humming along in construction equipment and drill rigs, submerged in marine environments and helping save lives in hospital generators, amongst many other applications. Diesel engines are popular for good reason. Not only do they have cleaner exhaust emissions, they are also known for more reliable starts in extreme temperatures.

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Topics: water, Water Contamination, diesel, filtration, case study, contaminination

Why You Need to Care About Micro-Dieseling

Posted by Scott Howard on Mon, Jan. 27, 2014

Most people are familiar with diesel engines and how they work, which includes a rapid compression of air. When you inject a fuel source, it creates an explosion. Did you know that micro-dieseling is similar? A front-end loader that runs a diesel engine is a macro-level (or big picture) of what it does on the micro (or smaller) level in a hydraulic pump.

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Topics: diesel, thermal event, fuel, hydraulic oil, contaminination

How to Keep Your Diesel Clean

Posted by Jim Harlan on Fri, May. 17, 2013

We've all been there -- the power goes out and instant panic sets in. Until you remember that you have a backup generator for just this type of situation. You rely on that generator to run your servers, emergency equipment or entire facility. 

But if you haven't tended to the diesel fuel in your storage tank, it could easily be contaminated with water and particulate, causing failure and requiring expensive repairs. 

One way to keep your diesel clean and dry is to replace the fuel at a set interval. This will ensure that your generator has all it needs to function in case of an emergency; however, it can prove to be costly.

What if we told you that you didn't have to replace the diesel, even if it were contaminated? 

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Topics: EHC, diesel, coalesce technology, cleanliness, ICB

Improving Diesel Engine Life

Posted by Jim Harlan on Thu, May. 09, 2013

The Problem: Premature Failure of Diesel Engines  

Today's diesel engines require cleaner fuel with injector pressures approaching 30,000 PSI and the evolution of injectors into sophisticated expensive electronic components. Diesel engine manufacturers have learned that ultra-fine particles that were of little consequence at 3,000 PSI are now causing premature failures at 30,000 PSI.

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Topics: diesel, case study, COD, FSL, DFE

  

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